CAMBIO

Pioneers in car-sharing.

At Cambio they know exactly what they want: having fewer cars is the way to more liveable cities. Cities with more space for terraces to sit out on, with more room to kick a ball about – or simply to make snowmen when the weather’s right. But their communication wasn’t doing this idea enough justice. So our task was to build a brand for Cambio with enough body to convince both the outside world and to satisfy the heartfelt pleas of their staff.

Always asking why

We started by delving into data. We immersed ourselves in demographics, examined reasons for purchasing, figured out where the Cambio audience consumes its media and researched the point at which they decide to become customers. But to create clarity about Cambio’s vision, mission and proposition, we had to link the data to that age-old question: why? So we kept on digging, workshop after workshop: why car-sharing? Why sustainability? Why a whole new world? And what did that world have to look

Purpose marketing: the end points the way to the means

Yet the answer to all these ‘why’ questions had to be simple. Cambio’s mission could have been: ‘to lease as many cars as possible’. But, in the end, that didn’t actually interest them. What Cambio wants is more space in the city – and hence fewer cars. According to their calculations, one shared car replaces thirteen ordinary cars. By focusing on this particular ‘why’ and opting strategically for purpose marketing, we created the perfect touchstone for each step in the branding process. Better still, we took a path that we can continue to follow in the future. None of those hit-or-miss campaigns, but carefully thought through steps that follow on logically from looking at things honestly. That’s the way you bind customers to your brand

Less NGO, more Uber

Let’s be honest: until recently, Cambio did not have the image of, say, an Uber of Lime’s scooters. Yet they were just as much pioneers and leaders in the sharing economy. Their enthusiastic fan base showed this was true, but the NGO factor in their communication was making it difficult for them to tap into other target audiences. We kept their logo, but everything else, from photography and colours to the copy we used was totally revamped; we knew that we were dealing with an audience willing to roll up its sleeves and search for something different, something

Having fewer cars is the way to more liveable cities.

A two-pronged media campaign

Cambio’s rebranded image had to be adhered to through a carefully geared media plan. Drawing on the available data and consumer insights, we created the right blend of mass media and digital channels. And in terms of content, the campaign was on two fronts. The first wave of the campaign reinforced the brand and continued to hammer home the same message: why? Why would you actually still want to buy your own car when you can drive around quite happily in a share-car from Cambio? We posted testimonials from Lotte, Lies, Steven and Paul and other members via Facebook and Instagram, as well as displaying banners at the major stations. That’s how we have sales a boost. For the other wave, we focused on branding by doing things such as celebrating Cambio’s 15th birthday at a big sharing party in Ghent to which all members were invited

Not customers, but members

Customers pay for your service and that’s it. But Cambio has customers who do more than just pay their bills. These are true believers, proud of their Cambio membership. The data also tells us that the sheer conviction of Cambio believers works outstandingly well on the doubters. That’s why we see Cambio customers as members, part of a club that both thinks and acts sustainably. A club that you want to join as an outsider.

Car-sharing works

21 football pitches. That’s how much space Cambio has already made in Flanders. And there’s still plenty more to come, because the number of Cambio members is growing by 20% per year. Car-sharing works – and it works even better the more people who join

> more info about this case

Lead agency: FOCUS ADVERTISING

Network cases

Menu